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Sleep Apnea

Snoring or Sleep Apnea?

Snoring is a vibration of soft tissues in the upper airway and is commonly a symptom of sleep apnea when a partial obstruction exists. Snoring can be effectively treated with an oral sleep appliance in the presence or absence of apnea.

What is sleep apnea?

Cessation of breathing during sleep may be caused by an airway obstruction, central nervous system disorder, or a combination of the two. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common type, and is usually caused by a anatomic collapse in the volume of the airway, typically due to the size and position of the tongue and soft palate. OSA may be managed with a positive pressure device such as a CPAP or BiPAP, an oral sleep appliance, or surgery.

What is an oral sleep appliance?

An oral sleep appliance is made up of two splints which fit on the upper and lower teeth and reposition the lower jaw slightly to increase the volume of the airway. These devices are very effective for treating snoring and mild to moderate apnea. Even patients with severe apnea can receive some benefit from wearing an oral sleep appliance with or without CPAP/BiPAP.

For those who cannot tolerate CPAP/BiPAP wear and are unwilling or unable to undergo surgery to manage their apnea, an oral sleep appliance may be the best treatment option. Oral sleep appliances are the best non-surgical alternative to positive airway pressure devices and are an excellent adjunctive therapy for CPAP/BiPAP users to lower the opererating pressure of their device. Dr. Cebula has extensive experience with the fabrication, delivery, and follow-up with oral sleep appliances, and understands the importance of working closely with each patient and their referring doctor.

Your first appointment

As a Board Certified Orofacial Pain specialist, Dr. Cebula screens every patient for signs and symptoms of sleep apnea. Patients are first evaluated by answering several questions pertaining to sleep apnea in their health history prior to their examination. During the patient exam the anatomy of the airway will be assessed as well as size and position of the tongue, palate, and jaws. If an overnight sleep study has not already been performed, further screening with a pulse-oximeter or home sleep test may be necessary prior to treatment.

Snoring or Sleep Apnea?

Snoring is a vibration of soft tissues in the upper airway and is commonly a symptom of sleep apnea when a partial obstruction exists. Snoring can be effectively treated with an oral sleep appliance in the presence or absence of apnea.

What is sleep apnea?

Cessation of breathing during sleep may be caused by an airway obstruction, central nervous system disorder, or a combination of the two. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common type, and is usually caused by a anatomic collapse in the volume of the airway, typically due to the size and position of the tongue and soft palate. OSA may be managed with a positive pressure device such as a CPAP or BiPAP, an oral sleep appliance, or surgery.

What is an oral sleep appliance?

An oral sleep appliance is made up of two splints which fit on the upper and lower teeth and reposition the lower jaw slightly to increase the volume of the airway. These devices are very effective for treating snoring and mild to moderate apnea. Even patients with severe apnea can receive some benefit from wearing an oral sleep appliance with or without CPAP/BiPAP.

For those who cannot tolerate CPAP/BiPAP wear and are unwilling or unable to undergo surgery to manage their apnea, an oral sleep appliance may be the best treatment option. Oral sleep appliances are the best non-surgical alternative to positive airway pressure devices and are an excellent adjunctive therapy for CPAP/BiPAP users to lower the opererating pressure of their device. Dr. Cebula has extensive experience with the fabrication, delivery, and follow-up with oral sleep appliances, and understands the importance of working closely with each patient and their referring doctor.

Your first appointment

As a Board Certified Orofacial Pain specialist, Dr. Cebula screens every patient for signs and symptoms of sleep apnea. Patients are first evaluated by answering several questions pertaining to sleep apnea in their health history prior to their examination. During the patient exam the anatomy of the airway will be assessed as well as size and position of the tongue, palate, and jaws. If an overnight sleep study has not already been performed, further screening with a pulse-oximeter or home sleep test may be necessary prior to treatment.

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